Rob Gallamore various ideas

FORECHECKING by Rob Gallamore
Whenever a defenseman has the puck and a reading of opponent defense 5 or 6 is on the action card a players forechecking ability comes into play. If one of the opposing winger or centermen has BOTH 20 assists and 50 penalty minutes on his card, he takes the puck away from the defenseman. That player then has an outside shot. If the puck is not forechecked, the defenseman has an outside shot.Example:RD Rob Blake has the puck and the action card reads opponent defense 6. The opposite winger for the RD is the left winger. Let us pretend Fedorov is at center and Shanahan at left wing. Fedorov’s card reads 35 assists/22 pm. Shanahan reads 37 assists/105 pm. Fedorov does not have both a minimum of 20 assists and 50 penalty minutes (he is short on pm) so he does not forecheck the puck off of Blake. But Shanahan has enough assists and penalty minues so Shanahan forechecks Blake and has an outside shot. Shanahan can now penetrate against Blake , shoot or pass. Back to the top


BLOCKING SHOTS by Rob Gallamore
Designate one defensemen from each team as a shot blocker or use the stats from http://www.nhl.com to find the best shot blocker from each team. Whenever a goalie rating occurs roll a team may choose to block the shot. Do do so roll two dice. If the dice reads a 3 the shot maybe blocked by your defenseman. Roll another die. If it is a 1-4, the shot is blocked. If it is a 5-6 the defenseman screens the goaltender attempting to block the shot and it is a goal.Example: Pavel Bure has an inside shot. He rolls a 6 and gets a goalie rating. The Vancouver coach has Mattias Ohlund on the ice and he is their designated shot blocker. Vancouver decides to try and block the shot. He rolls two dice and it is a 3. He then rolls one die and rolls a 4. The shot is blocked by Ohlund and he has control. Back to the top


4 on 4 OVERTIME CARDS 
You need a bit more excitement in your 4 on 4 overtime to match those games on tv. Try putting these 8 plays on recipe cards and use these cards for your 4 on 4 overtime . By Rob Gallamore

  • Opponent defense 5
  • Outside shot for any player
  • Passing C
  • Inside shot I-OPP
  • Opponent defense 9
  • Opponent defense 6
  • Passing A
  • Inside shot I-OPP

Scramble the cards and use as an action deck. My overtimes have definitely been spruced up because of the increase in offense in overtime.Back to the top


INJURY CHART 
By Rob Gallamore – Based on 82 game season.
When an injury occurs roll the 20 sided dice. 1-10 there is an injury to the home team and 11-20 an injury to the visiting team. Then roll the six sided die to see who is injured.

1- Center 2- Right Wing 3- Left Wing 4- Left Defense 5- Right Defense 6- Goalie.

Next look at the games played of the injured player and follow the chart below

Games played — length of injury 
80+ games – injured for duration of game only
75-79 gp – injured for 1 game
70-74 gp – injured for 3 games
65-69 gp – injured for 6 games
60-64 gp – injured for 8 games
55-59 gp – injured for 11 games
50-54 gp – inured for 13 games
45-49 gp – injured for 16 games
40-44 gp – injured for 18 games
0-40 gp – injured for 20 games


TIMEOUTS 
By Rob Gallamore 
Since strat says you cannot change your offensive strategies until a faceoff timeouts could be used. Teams are allowed one timeout during the game when they have possession of the puck. The team can then change their players or offense or defense mode. Play resumes with a faceoff at center ice


 

REALISTIC ICE TIME PROPOSAL 
By Rob Gallamore 

Looking over rosters it appears the average ice time for teams seems something along these lines. 
All teams really vary but this might be a starting point. 
FORWARDS 
First line- 20 minutes in strat terms ...30 cards/10 per period 
Second line- 18 minutes in strat terms ...28 cards/ 9 per period 
Third line- 14 minutes in strat terms ...22 cards/ 7 per period 
Fourth line - 8 minutes in strat terms ...13 cards/ 4 per period 
DEFENSE 
First pair - 24 minutes in strat terms ...36 cards/12 per period 
Second pair - 20 minutes in strat terms....30 cards/ 10 per period 
Third Pair - 16 minutes in strat terms....25 cards/ 8 per period 

You must factor in 8 penalties a game (10,154 penalties last year in the NHL divided by 1230 games).
 8 penalties would be 16 minutes or 24 cards to be divided up. So 4 on the powerplay and 4 on the PK 


Here is where I hit a brick wall :))) Any math scholars out there ? :) 
I would think the first line and the second line would each play on 2 powerplays each game 
or that would be 4 extra minutes or 6 cards extra each game. So whack off 2 cards each period for those lines. 
For penalty killing I would use the third line and the first line . So whack off 2 cards each period for those lines. 
The fourth line rarely plays on the PK or PP so they should be guaranteed those 4 cards per period. 
So things would look like this when we subtract PP and PK cards: 
FORWARDS 
First line- 20 minutes in strat terms ...30 cards/6 per period 
Second line- 18 minutes in strat terms ...28 cards/ 7 per period 
Third line- 14 minutes in strat terms ...22 cards/ 5 per period 
Fourth line - 8 minutes in strat terms ...13 cards/ 4 per period 
DEFENSE 
First pair - 24 minutes in strat terms ...36 cards/8 per period 
Second pair - 20 minutes in strat terms....30 cards/ 6 per period 
Third Pair - 16 minutes in strat terms....25 cards/ 8 per period 

The result is that we have taken off 8 cards for powerplays. Those 8 cards should 
be added in evenly for all lines to take into account the randomness of penalties. 
The results would be this for a replay: 
2+ 2 +2 +2 
FORWARDS 
First line- 20 minutes in strat terms ...30 cards/8 per period 
Second line- 18 minutes in strat terms ...28 cards/ 9 per period 
Third line- 14 minutes in strat terms ...22 cards/ 7 per period 
Fourth line - 8 minutes in strat terms ...13 cards/ 6 per period 
DEFENSE 
First pair - 24 minutes in strat terms ...36 cards/11 per period 
Second pair - 20 minutes in strat terms....30 cards/ 9 per period 
Third Pair - 16 minutes in strat terms....25 cards/ 10 per period 
So mathematically it looks like Phil is correct. Assuming my math is correct. 
For a proper replay each line above should play those cards above or as Phil says even cards for each period. 
Since the computer game is 35 cards per period, just add those 5 cards evenly to each line. 
If there is a flaw in my math, please let me know. I am anything but a mathematician.

ACTUAL PLAYING TIME

By Rob Gallamore.....
I agree 100% with Gord on players now must be restricted to their actual
ice time to gain
any sort of realism. First, I surely hope Strat adds that ice time to the
cards. Secondly, I have been trying to come up with a system that will be
easy to use .  This suggestion might be a good one for draft leagues:

This is by no means perfect but might be a start . How about : 
1- round off all playing minutes for players to a multiple of 5
2- Play 4 lines for all 3 periods .  Change defense with each line change.
Essentially 5 minute blocks.
3- Design road instructions for all three periods with the players minutes
(now rounded to multiple of five)
fitting into those 5 minute blocks. E.g. V.Bure has 16 minutes played in
real life. round off to 15 . He can play 3 five minute blocks (or 1 per
period)during the game.  Dismiss pp and sh situations for now.
Kelly Chase has 6 minutes of playing time. Round that off to 5 and he only
gets 1 five minute shift during the course of the game.

If no penalties are called players stick to their actual number of minutes.
Not a perfect system but maybe a start.....at least much better than having
kelly Chase play the full game in a 3 line system.


To incorporate PP and SH situations. It seems NHL teams average about 3-4
pp situations a game. I dont have the stats in front of me (someone may
want to check), but I believe it is 3 which is 6 minutes per game. 
4- If you want to incorporate PP and SH situations, assume that each team
will get 5 minutes of PP and SH time each game and fill your draft league
sheet out with that in mind. E.g. Bure - if he is on the powerplay , he
will get 2 regular shifts and 1 powerplay shift. During course of the game
, only use the 1 powerplay unit
rather than Strats suggested 2. Over the course of a full year you may get
only 1 pp chance in one game and maybe 4 in another game. I think things
would even out over the course of the year.

Again not perfect, but a start . I included 2 lineups below. The one that
incorporated PP/SH times looks more realistic.

E.g. (my draft league team....Without PP)
Period 1....mp beside player and rounded off 
Kariya,25- WEight,20 Jagr,25  Sydor,20  Ohlund,25
Naslund,20  Messier,20 Mogilny,20  Harmlik,25, Lummme, 25
Bertuzzi,20 Walker,15  Marshall,15  Matvichuk,20  Aucoin,25
Rheaume,15  Scatchard,15  Doan,15  Harmlik, Ohlund
Period 2
Kariya, WEight, Jagr, Sydor, Ohlund
Naslund, Messier, Mogilny, Harmlik, Lumme
Bertuzzi, Walker, Marshall, Matvichuk, Aucoin
Kariya, Messier, Jagr, Sydor, Aucoin

Period 3
Kariya, WEight, Jagr, Sydor, Ohlund
Naslund, Messier, Mogilny, Harmlik, Lumme
Naslund, Walker, Mogilny, Matvichuk, Aucoin
Kariya, Weight , Jagr, Harmlik, Aucoin


WITH PP/SH SITUATIONS MENTIONED ABOVE   ***** This looks more realistic.

E.g. (my draft league team)
Period 1....mp beside player and rounded off 
Kariya,25- WEight,20 Jagr,25  Sydor,20  Ohlund,25
Naslund,20  Messier,20 Mogilny,20  Harmlik,25, Lummme, 25
Bertuzzi,20 Walker,15  Marshall,15  Matvichuk,20  Aucoin,25
Rheaume,15  Scatchard,15  Doan,15  Harmlik, Ohlund

Period 2
Kariya, WEight, Jagr, Sydor, Ohlund
Naslund, Messier, Mogilny, Harmlik, Lumme
Bertuzzi, Walker, Marshall, Matvichuk, Aucoin
Rheaume, Messier, Doan, Sydor, Lumme

Period 3
Kariya, WEight, Jagr, Sydor, Ohlund
Naslund, Messier, Mogilny, Harmlik, Lumme
Naslund, Walker, Mogilny, Matvichuk, Aucoin
Kariya, Weight , Jagr, Harmlik, Aucoin

PP- Kariya, Weight, Jagr, Sydor, Aucoin
SH- Scatchard, Marshall, Matvichuk, Ohlund

Other instructions to follow
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